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Kick Butts Day – Quit Smoking to Improve Your Health

March  16,  2016 in

Tobacco use is the leading cause of preventable death in the United States, imposing a terrible toll in health, lives and dollars on families, businesses and government. Tobacco kills 480,000 people annually – more than AIDS, alcohol, car accidents, illegal drugs, murders and suicides combined.

Tobacco costs the U.S. approximately $170 billion in health care expenditures and $151 billion in lost productivity each year.

While the United States has made major progress against tobacco use, nearly one in five Americans still smokes, and more than 2,800 kids try their first cigarette each day.

Kick Butts Day
Quitting smoking, on the other hand, can improve mental health and addiction recovery outcomes. And, it also helps save lives. That’s why we support Kick Butts Day!

What Is Kick Butts Day

Kick Butts Day is a national day of activism that empowers youth to stand out, speak up and seize control against Big Tobacco. Kick Butts Day is March 16, 2016. On Kick Butts Day, teachers, youth leaders and health advocates organize events to raise awareness of the problem of tobacco use in their state or community, encourage youth to reject the tobacco industry’s deceptive marketing and stay tobacco-free, and urge elected officials to take action to protect kids from tobacco. Kick Butts Day is organized by the Campaign for Tobacco-Free Kids. The first Kick Butts Day was held in 1996.

Why You Should Quit Smoking

Studies show that:

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  • Quitting smoking can decrease depression, anxiety, and stress; and increase positive mood and quality of life.
  • For individuals in treatment for substance use disorders, smoking cessation can increase long-term abstinence from alcohol and other drugs.
  • Quitting smoking improves your health.

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What Happens When You Quit

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  • Immediately after quitting smoking, heart rate and blood pressure, which is abnormally high while smoking, begin to return to normal.
  • Within a few hours, the level of carbon monoxide, which reduces the blood’s ability to carry oxygen, begins to decline.
  • Within a few weeks, circulation improves, you don’t produce as much phlegm, and you don’t cough or wheeze as often.
  • The workload on the heart is decreased and cardiac function is improved.
  • Food tastes better, and your sense of smell returns to normal.
  • Everyday activities no longer leave you out of breath.
  • Within several months of quitting, you experience significant improvements in lung function.
  • In one year, your risk of heart disease, heart attack, and stroke is halved.
  • In five years, many kinds of cancer, including lung, larynx, mouth, stomach, cervix, bladder, show decline in risk, and that decline approaches the risk of someone who has never smoked.
  • Within 10 to 15 years, risk of lung disease, including bronchitis and emphysema, are decreased.
  • Conditions such as cataracts, macular degeneration, thyroid conditions, hearing loss, dementia, and osteoporosis are positively affected.
  • Nerve endings in the mouth and nose begin to regenerate, improving taste and smell.
  • Medications may work better, enabling some to be taken in decreased doses.
  • If you’re taking birth control pills, quitting smoking will decrease your chance of heart attack and stroke due to clotting.
  • You’ll have decreased risk for impotence and infertility.
  • If you’re pregnant, you’ll protect your unborn child from Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and low birth weight.
  • Years will be added to your life: people who quit smoking, regardless of their age, are less likely than those who continue to smoke to die from smoking-related illness.

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Rebecca’s Story About How She Quit Smoking

Rebecca's Story about How She Quit Smoking

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